A June to Swoon Over On SoHo

Heading SoHo’s highlights in June is a new series from Robert Kirkman, the creator of The Walking Dead.

Outcast, which will replace Fear the Walking Dead 9.30 Mondays from June 6, is billed as “an epic new horror series delving deep into the world of demonic possession”.

Cinemax (Strike Back) in the US already has ordered a second season of the series, which is which is based on Kirkman and Paul Azaceta’s comic book of the same name.

Patrick Fugit (Almost Famous), Philip Glenister (Life on Mars) and Wrenn Schmidt (Boardwalk Empire) star.

Next month SoHo also will screen new seasons of Ray Donovan (8.30 Tuesdays from June 28), Hell on Wheels (9.30 Tuesdays from June 14) and Line of Duty (8.30 Sundays from June 5).

It also will premiere Dice (9.30 Thursdays from June 30), a semi-autobiographical Showtime comedy in which ’80s comedian Andrew Dice Clay heads to Vegas to make a comeback.

It’s just gone to air to mixed reviews in the US. Entertainment Weekly said it was “brimming with weirdness” and the Wall Street Journal called it “an explosion of heat and vigor and passion” but the New York Times said it “invests an awful lot in the comedic value of crassness” and The Hollywood Reporter complained of a “general unevenness”.

June box sets include Fear the Walking Dead S2A and Baskets (June 4), Togetherness S2 and Girls S5 (June 11), Banshee S4 and Ballers S1 (June 18), and The Americans S4 (June 25).

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3 Responses to “A June to Swoon Over On SoHo”

  1. Line of Duty is an excellent police drama series, have watched the previous series and looked forward to viewing this new series. But the sound quality is letting it down, the background noise is louder than the dialogue and makes it difficult to hear the conversations in noisy environments! Why is that?

  2. I presume it’s do with the mixing. There have been complaints about other BBC productions in this respect, most notably Jamaica Inn and most recently Happy Valley. Sometimes programme makers, in their quest for realism, forget about what it’s like to sit at home and try to pick up on audio nuances, especially if viewers don’t have hi-fi or home theatre systems. The same is true of movies — I found most of the dialogue in the first half-hour of The Revenant incomprehensible when I saw it in the cinema.

  3. I agree that this is an excellent show but the sound coming out of the rear speakers in particular is way too loud.

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